Job Offer Letter

Job Offer Letter

November 18th, 2018

A job offer letter is used to formally offer a position to a candidate, and provide important information including start date, compensation, work hours, and job title. They are also known as an employment offer letter.

Special Offer

Post a job to 100 free job boards with one submission.

Post Jobs for FREE

Completely free trial, no credit card required.

Reach over 150 million candidates.

We also have an offer letter email sample that can be used when you need a sample offer letter to send via email. There is no standard offer letter format so use what you think is best for your company. Take our job offer letter sample template and add in some of your company personality.

Also, you may need to use a different sample job offer letter template for each job you hire for. Less-senior roles may be more appropriate for a more informal job offer template.

Top 3 Job Offer Templates:

Job Offer Letter Download.

Download this free job offer letter sample template in Word format.

Download Letter Instant download. No email required.

1. Standard job offer letter sample template.

Dear [Applicant Name],

[Company Name] is excited to bring you on board as [job title].

We’re just a few formalities away from getting down to work. Please take the time to review our formal offer. It includes important details about your compensation, benefits and the terms and conditions of your anticipated employment with [Company Name].

[Company Name] is offering a [full time, part time, etc.] position for you as [job title], reporting to [immediate manager/supervisor] starting on [proposed start date] at [workplace location]. Expected hours of work are [days of week and hours of work].

In this position, [Company Name] is offering to start you at a pay rate of [dollar amount or annual base salary] per [year, hour, annual salary, etc.]. You will be paid on a [weekly, monthly, etc] basis, starting [date of next pay period].

As part of your compensation, we're also offering [If applicable, you’ll describe your bonus, profit sharing, commission structure, stock options, and compensation committee rules here].

As an employee of [Company Name] you will be eligible for [briefly name benefits, such as health insurance, stock plan, dental insurance, etc.].

Please indicate your agreement with these terms and accept this offer by signing and dating this agreement on or before [offer expiration date].

Sincerely, [Sender Name]

Looking for something less formal than the job offer letter example above? We've got a great informal job offer letter template below that's perfect for sending out a less formal job offer via email. This simple job offer letter sample is perfect for roles where you want to add some personality into a fairly dry offer letter.

Informal Job Offer Email Template Download.

Download this free informal job offer email sample template in Word format.

Download Template Instant download. No email required.

2. Informal job offer email sample template.

Dear [Applicant Name],

[Company Name] is excited to bring you on board as [Job Title].

You were our top candidate out of [# of candidates]. We were really sold on your [details about the candidate that made them your choice].

Below you can read details about compensation, benefits and the terms and conditions of your anticipated job with [Company Name].

[Company Name] is offering a [full time, part time, etc.] position for you as [Job Title], reporting to [immediate manager/supervisor] starting on [proposed start date] at [workplace location]. Expected hours of work are [days of week and hours of work].

We'll start you at a pay rate of [dollar amount or annual base salary] per [year, hour, etc.]. You will be paid on a [weekly, monthly, etc] basis, starting [date of next pay period].

As part of your compensation, we're also offering [If applicable, you’ll describe your bonus, profit-sharing, stock options, commission structure, compensation committee here].

As an employee of [Company Name], you will be eligible for [briefly name benefits, such as health insurance, dental insurance, etc.].

Got questions? Feel free to email us or call.

Sincerely, [Sender Name]

Getting ready to make an offer, but want to bring the candidate in one last time beforehand to discuss details and reassure yourself? We've got a warm up email below to take care of just that for you.

Job Offer Warm Up Email Template Download.

Download this free job offer warm up email sample template in Word format.

Download Template Instant download. No email required.

3. Job offer warm-up email sample template.

Dear [Applicant Name],

That last interview went really well. We had [# of applicants] apply for this position, but you're our top choice because [reasons this was the successful candidate]. We also think you'd be a great fit with our team because [reason you think they'd be a great cultural fit].

Do you have time [date and time you'd like to meet] to review the details of this job and talk about an offer?

Sincerely, [Sender Name]

The offer stage can be a nerve-wracking part of the hiring process.

When you've found your first choice, you want to make a solid offer that gets candidates off the job market quickly. This is especially important now because we're in a job seekers' market, with more job openings going unfilled than ever. Because of that, the best candidates will often have multiple companies vying for them.

Of course, in your effort to make the right offer, you want to make sure you get the legal aspects of your offer right - a poorly put together job offer can cause serious legal issues.

The process of making a job offer can look quite different, depending on the company and the job. Some companies hire people "on-the-spot," with no real formalized process, other companies have well-documented processes that take a little time.

How to Make a Job Offer.

1. Get any necessary approval for the hire.

You don't want to make an offer that, it turns out, you can't back up. Need help with that? We've got a great article on job requisition forms.

2. Send an email to set up a phone call.

Don't just try to send them a "yes or no" email or make an out-of-the-blue call asking them to make a decision. Send an email setting up a time to get their thoughts on an offer.

3. Call and make an informal offer.

You'll want to get to this point fairly quickly. Don't go so fast that it makes you seem desperate, but if you can get them from application to offer in 2 weeks, you'll beat most competitors to the punch.

4. Send out your formal offer.

This will include detailed information, such as the job description and compensation package they're agreeing to. See our templates below for more help.

5. Give the news to the people you didn't hire quickly.

Don't overlook this part, it's an important part of employer branding - treat candidates you passed over well, and you may be able to tap them again when the right position does open, or get referrals from them in the future.

What Needs To Be In A Job Offer Letter
What Needs to Be in a Job Offer Letter:
  • Position title.
  • Employment type - part-time, full time, etc.
  • Compensation - annual salary, hourly rate, bonuses, etc.
  • ​Benefits - health, dental, paid time off, etc.
  • ​Start date, schedule, and work location.
  • Pay dates - monthly, weekly, etc.
  • Who the candidate will report to.
  • Offer expiration date.

Additional Information for Job Offer Letters:

1. At-will employment.

In every state, with the exception of Montana, employees are presumed to be at-will, meaning they or the employer may terminate the employment relationship at any time, for any reason. This does not apply to certain employment situations and under some collective bargaining agreements.

Read our complete guide to at-will employment.

2. Exempt or non-exempt.

Some employers choose to include a statement in the offer letter about exemption status. Exempt employees are not eligible for overtime (typically salaried employees). Non-exempt employees are eligible for overtime. Read more about the difference between exempt and non-exempt employees.

3. Conditions and agreements.

You may want to include any conditions that potential employees must meet after being hired or agreements they're expected to sign. These often include:

  • I-9 (U.S. employment eligibility verification).
  • Employee background checks.
  • Drug screening.
  • Non-compete agreements.
  • Non-disclosure agreements.
  • Intellectual property agreements.

Common Questions at Offer Stage:

1. How long should you wait for a job offer response?

If you didn't put an expiration date on your job offer, how long should you wait to hear from them? We recommend giving them 3 days to think about it, ideally with the offer made on Friday, and the expiration on Monday.

2. What if your offer of employment is rejected?

Sometimes it happens. It will be worth the effort to find out why - it's information you can use to help improve future offers. Also, keep things cordial, even if you're disappointed. You never know when this person will come back, and they may have smart friends they'll recommend if they've had a good experience. Send a nice response thanking them for their time, and asking if there was anything you could have to change their decision.

3. What if you change your mind?

Things happen - you get new information, or there's a sudden change at your company that makes you want to rescind your offer letter agreement. If it is an at-will position, then there may not be any legal issues - but consult an attorney before making a final decision.

The candidate will be understandably upset - it's possible they've turned down other offers by now. Let them know what happened as soon as possible, and explain your reasons in detail.

4. What if your successful candidate changes their mind?

You may be tempted to get angry at this point. You've put in a lot of time and money, made the offer, and possibly sent out emails to other candidates letting them know the position has been filled. And now it's not filled.

Keep the relationship respectful and see if you can learn what happened. In the meantime, if you've treated the other candidates well, you should be able to get back in touch with your previous choices and get back on track.

Job Offer Letter Examples:

Here are some examples from big companies, including the offer Marissa Mayer received to become the Chief Executive Officer of Yahoo: