At-Will Employment

Complete Guide with State Information and Definition

At Will Employment
Learn what at-will employment is, why it's important, what the common exceptions are, and what states are affected by this rule, and which aren't.

Last updated November 19th, 2017

At-will employment means that an employer can fire an employee for any reason, or no reason, with no warning, and without having to establish just cause. About 74% of U.S. workers are considered at-will employees.

Which States Are Not at Will Employment?
Which States Are Not At Will Employment

Montana is the only state in the U.S. that is completely not at-will. All other states in the U.S. have some version of at-will employment. In Montana, employers can practice at-will employment during a probationary period only. Other states do have exceptions to at-will employment.

Common Exceptions to At-Will Employment:

1. Public sector employment.

Public workers are not typically subject to at-will employment.

2. Unionized jobs.

Union workers may have collective bargaining agreements that exempt them from at-will employment.

3. Contract basis employment.

Contract workers may have a contract with their employer that exempts them.

4. An employee refusing to violate public policy.

At-will does not apply when employees refuse to violate public policy or take action that is protected by public policy. The exception does not apply in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maine, Nebraska, New York, Rhode Island, and Florida.

5. An employee taking actions protected by public policy.

At-will does not apply when employees take action that is protected by public policy. This includes whistleblowing or reporting of unsafe or illegal activity. The exception does not apply in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maine, Nebraska, New York, Rhode Island, and Florida.

6. An employer implying that there is a contract.

In all but 14 states employees may not have at-will status if the employer implies a contract. The 14 states include Arizona, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, and Virginia.

7. A breach of good faith by the employer.

At-will does not apply if there has been a breach of good faith by the employer. For example, firing someone to deny a retirement package. This applies in 11 states. The 11 states include Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Idaho, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming.

8. An employer discriminating.

At-will employment does not apply if an employee is terminated due to discrimination.

9. An employee refusing to do something illegal.

At-will employment does not apply if an employee is terminated for refusing to do something that is illegal.

10. An employer retaliating against union members.

If an employer terminates employees for union activity, at-will employment does not apply.

Final Thoughts:

That should help you to determine if your employees are at will, and help you avoid situations that nullify your at-will status.