Occupational Health Nurse Interview Questions

Occupational Health Nurse Interview Questions

May 16th, 2019

An Occupational Health Nurse monitors and ensures the health and safety of the workforce, through complying with health and safety legislation. It is the Occupational Health Nurse's duty to create a healthier and safer work environment.

When interviewing Occupational Health Nurses, look for candidates who demonstrate up-to-date knowledge of health and safety legislation, shows enthusiasm for health policies, and demonstrates good teaching skills. Be wary of candidates who show limited awareness of health and safety standards.

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Interview Questions for Occupational Health Nurses

1. Has there been a time when you accidentally caused conflict with a worker? How did you resolve it?

Demonstrates interpersonal skills and problem solving. When working with people, a successful Occupational Health Nurse should be flexible in working outside the box to ensure the proper care.

2. Has there been an occasion where you developed a new health policy? How did you implement it?

Look for candidates who demonstrate creative thinking, as well as knowledge of current health trends. Candidates who show initiative would be able to present an idea they have not had opportunity to develop and implement,

3. How would you diffuse a conflict in the workplace?

Demonstrates interpersonal skills and problem solving.

4. Can you describe a time when you have implemented something new that you have learnt?

Look for candidates who demonstrate current knowledge of health and safety practices, as well as lateral thinking.

5. How would you handle a negative reaction from a management team member when attempting to implement a new health and safety regulation?

Demonstrates interpersonal skills and the ability to negotiate with upper management.

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